Literary Form as Postcolonial Critique

Burkitt argues that these works disrupt and undermine the traditions of particular forms and genres, and most notably the expectations attached to the prose novel, poetry, and epic.

Literary Form as Postcolonial Critique

Focusing on works by Derek Walcott, Les Murray, Anne Carson, and Bernardine Evaristo, Katharine Burkitt investigates the relationship between literary form and textual politics in postcolonial narrative poems and verse-novels. Burkitt argues that these works disrupt and undermine the traditions of particular forms and genres, and most notably the expectations attached to the prose novel, poetry, and epic. This subversion of form, Burkitt argues, is an important aspect of the texts' postcoloniality as they locate themselves critically in relation to literary convention, and they are all concerned with matters of social, racial, and national identities in a world where these categories are inherently complicated. In addition, the awareness of epic tradition in these texts unites them as 'post-epics', in that as they reuse the myths and motifs of a variety of epics, they question the status of the form, demonstrate it to be inherently malleable, and regenerate its stories for the contemporary world. As she examines the ways in which postcolonial texts rewrite the traditions of classical epics for the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Burkitt ties close textual analysis to a critical intervention in the politics of form.

More Books:

Literary Form as Postcolonial Critique
Language: en
Pages: 176
Authors: Katharine Burkitt
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-05-06 - Publisher: Routledge

Focusing on works by Derek Walcott, Les Murray, Anne Carson, and Bernardine Evaristo, Katharine Burkitt investigates the relationship between literary form and textual politics in postcolonial narrative poems and verse-novels. Burkitt argues that these works disrupt and undermine the traditions of particular forms and genres, and most notably the expectations
Literary Form as Postcolonial Critique
Language: en
Pages: 176
Authors: Katharine Burkitt
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-05-06 - Publisher: Routledge

Focusing on works by Derek Walcott, Les Murray, Anne Carson, and Bernardine Evaristo, Katharine Burkitt investigates the relationship between literary form and textual politics in postcolonial narrative poems and verse-novels. Burkitt argues that these works disrupt and undermine the traditions of particular forms and genres, and most notably the expectations
Literature, Pedagogy, and Climate Change
Language: en
Pages: 178
Authors: Roman Bartosch
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-11-21 - Publisher: Springer Nature

Literature, Pedagogy, and Climate Change: Text Models for a Transcultural Ecology asks two questions: How do we read (in) the Anthropocene? And what can reading teach us? To answer these questions, the book develops a concept of transcultural ecology that understands fiction and interpretation as text models that help address
Anne Carson: Antiquity
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Laura Jansen
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-10-07 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

From her seminal Eros the Bittersweet (1986) to her experimental Float (2016), Bakkhai (2017) and Norma Jeane Baker of Troy (2019), Anne Carson's engagement with antiquity has been deeply influential to generations of readers, both inside and outside of academia. One reason for her success is the versatile scope of
Empire's Wake: Postcolonial Irish Writing and the Politics of Modern Literary Form
Language: en
Pages: 250
Authors: Mark Quigley
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013 - Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

Traces development of Irish literary modernism from the 1920s to the 1990s through the writings of James Joyce, John Millington Synge, Samuel Beckett, Sean O'Faolain, Frank McCourt, and the Blasket Island autobiographers, Tomas O'Crohan and Maurice O'Sullivan. Considers Irish literature in relation to Irish nationalism and aftermath of British empire.